No threat to India from Japan radiation leak: Govt

The government on Wednesday maintained there was no threat to India from radiation leaks from the quake-hit nuclear plant in Fukushima in Japan.

Last Updated: Mar 16, 2011, 15:47 PM IST

New Delhi: The government on Wednesday maintained
there was no threat to India from radiation leaks from the
quake-hit nuclear plant in Fukushima in Japan as these were
travelling east of that country and the distance too was more
than 6,500 km across the ocean mass.

"I would like to assure the nation that on the basis of
information received till date there is no danger to India
from the radiation leaks in Fukushima," Minister of State for
Science and Technology Ashwini Kumar told reporters outside
Parliament House.

Blasts have occurred in three nuclear reactors at the
Fukushima plant and there were apprehensions that radiation
from the area could affect other parts of the world.

"The radiation, we are told, is travelling eastwards and
we are on the opposite direction from Japan. The distance
between India and Fukushima is more than 6,500 km," Kumar
said, assuring that there was no danger.

He maintained that this radiation is travelling over the
Pacific Ocean mass. "Normally the rains will come and the
radiation vapours will drop into the ocean," Kumar said.

Meanwhile, Union Health Minister Ghulam Nabi Azad while observing that the Southeast
Asian region was far more vulnerable to natural disasters than
others, today said it
was imperative to build capacities in countries to resiliently
face disasters like the quake and subsequent tsunami in Japan.

"The tsunami that barreled into Japan, is also a rude
reminder to all of us, that natural disasters can, in minutes,
wipe-out any progress made towards improving the living
standards and lifestyles of our people," Azad said while
inaugurating a three-day meeting of the `Partners for Health
in Southeast Asia`.

He said that countries which have the resources are
able to mitigate the after effects. Resource constrained
countries resort to symptomatic mitigation largely driven by
international aid.

"Therefore, it is imperative that we build capacities
in our countries and communities to resiliently face such
disasters," he said, adding that it was more important for
those living in Southeast Asia because as a region, it was
far more vulnerable to the vagaries of nature.

"As policy makers we have to tackle these growing
issues comprehensively," the minister said.

PTI