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Now, China doesn’t recognise J&K border

Beijing has literally knocked off the 1,597-km-long border that separates J&K and China.



Zeenews Bureau

New Delhi: While Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao on his just-concluded India visit expressed hope about resolving the Sino-India border dispute, Beijing has created another controversy by not recognising the border it shares with Jammu and Kashmir.

“China and India share a 2,000-km-long border that has never been formally demarcated,” Xinuha, China’s official news agency, stated earlier this week, literally knocking off the 1,597-km-long border that the separated J&K and China.

Xinuha’s reference to the border issue was based on an official briefing by Chinese Assistant Foreign Minister Hu Zhengyue, ahead of Wen’s visit.

India, on the other hand, considers the operational border with China to be nearly 3500 kilometres long.

Notably, the Chinese government’s fresh stance could be viewed vis-à-vis its policy regarding Jammu and Kashmir. In the recent past, Beijing has been issuing stapled visas to residents of J&K, indirectly terming the territory is a disputed one.

During his visit, Wen said China and India have agreed to set up a working mechanism for consultation and coordination on border affairs.

Terming the boundary issue between the two countries as an "historical legacy", Wen had said that it would not be easy to completely resolve the matter.

Wen meanwhile also slammed the Indian media saying: "In recent years, there has never been a single shot fired... in border areas between us. However, the boundary question has been repeatedly sensationalized by media."

From Zee News

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