close
This ad will auto close in 10 seconds

Political will vital to tackle Maoists: Ex-IB chief

A joint political offensive by all parties having faith in democracy is essential to effectively tackle the Maoists, according to former Director General of Intelligence Bureau, Ajith Kumar Doval.



Thiruvananthapuram: A joint political offensive by all parties having faith in democracy is essential to effectively tackle the Maoists, according to former Director General of Intelligence Bureau, Ajith Kumar Doval.

"Maoists can not be tackled with a soft approach. Firm political will, clear-cut plans, meticulously worked out strategies and stern decisions are vital for that",he said at
a lecture organised by pro-RSS Vichara Vedi here last evening.

He said the strength of Naxalite groups, as the ultra leftist outfits in India are known, had doubled in the country in the last six years. Once confined to isolated pockets, they
had expanded their presence to 203 districts in 14 districts and the number of armed cadre gone up to at least 15,000 from 7000, he said.

More importantly, the Maoists had succeeded in acquiring sophisticated weapons and training cadres in using them in their war against the state, Doval noted.
"At the same time the Centre and state governments have not been able to effectively counter the threat posed by Leftist ultras, who have been receiving support from all sorts of anti national elements in their subversive activities," he said.
The prevailing situation required a joint political offensive against the Maoists by impressing upon the masses, the need to defend democracy, which was the best political system available to them, he added.

PTI

From Zee News

0 Comment - Join the Discussions

trending

photo gallery

video

DNA EXCLUSIVES

India vs Australia: Why do we need three Aussie experts for series in India?

With just Rs 1,080, you can ensure that a girl does not drop out of school

Maharashtra: Here's BJP's 'plan B' if Shiv Sena quits coalition government

What Doklam stand-off has taught us

Year after Uri attack: Real culprits at large, but Pakistan feels the heat