Root out terror emanating from outside Afghan: India

India has appealed to the international community to continue its efforts to root out terrorism emanating from outside the war-torn nation`s borders.

New York: With international troops preparing to leave Afghanistan by 2014, India has appealed to the international community to continue its efforts to root out terrorism emanating from outside the war-torn nation`s borders and help Kabul in its path to economic recovery.
Signs of a "transition recession" were already visible in
Afghanistan and progress has been made in the last one decade
since the international community came together to assist
the war-ravaged nation, India`s permanent representative to
the UN, Hardeep Singh Puri said.

Terrorist violence in Afghanistan has shown no signs of
receding and civilian casualties attributed to anti-government
elements have risen over the last five years, hitting a peak
in 2011.

"Terrorism continues to find sustenance and support from
a dangerous osmosis of ideologies, ambitions, training and
operations among the syndicate of terrorism in the region with
suicide terrorism as its main technique, and targets not
limited to Afghanistan.

"We need concerted action to isolate and root out this syndicate of terrorism which includes elements of the al Qaida, Taliban, LeT and other terrorist and extremist groups operating mainly from outside Afghanistan`s borders," Puri said during a UNSC debate on Afghanistan yesterday.

He said with the gradual drawing down of international forces from their combat role, "there are already signs of a transition recession" in Afghanistan.

The international community has to find ways and means to ensure Afghanistan "does not feel abandoned by a withdrawal of assistance, at least in terms of quantity, if not quality, of international assistance required, post-2014."

The Indian envoy noted that Afghanistan needs a comprehensive strategy for its national development that takes into account its status of being a Least Developed Country, land-locked situation, three decades of conflict and a continued existential threat to its future from terrorism.

Such a strategy should include security cooperation, official development assistance, capacity-building and education, trade access and foreign investment commensurate with its needs, he added.

PTI

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