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Black hole collisions shed light on most energetic event in universe for first time ever

Black hole collisions has provided a deeper insight into the most energetic event in universe, the merging of two spinning, orbiting black holes into a much larger black hole, for first time ever.


Black hole collisions shed light on most energetic event in universe for first time ever

Washington: Black hole collisions has provided a deeper insight into the most energetic event in universe, the merging of two spinning, orbiting black holes into a much larger black hole, for first time ever.

The work by Dr Michael Kesden, assistant professor of physics at UT Dallas, and his colleagues provides for the first time solutions to decades-old equations that describe conditions as two black holes in a binary system orbit one another and spiral in toward collision.

Kesden said that the solutions should not only significantly impact the study of black holes, but also the search for gravitational waves in the cosmos. Albert Einstein 's general theory of relativity predicts that two massive objects orbiting in a binary system should move closer together as the system emits a type of radiation called gravitational waves.

While Einstein's theories predict the existence of gravitational waves, they have not been directly detected. But the ability to "see" gravitational waves would open up a new window to view and study the universe.

Optical telescopes can capture photos of visible objects, such as stars and planets, and radio and infrared telescopes can reveal additional information about invisible energetic events. Gravitational waves would provide yet another medium through which to examine astrophysical phenomena, Kesden said.

The equations Kesden solved deal specifically with the spin angular momentum of binary black holes and a phenomenon called precession.

In addition to solving existing equations, Kesden also derived equations that will allow scientists to statistically track spin precession from black hole formation to merger far more efficiently and quickly.

The study is published in the journal Physical Review Letters. 

From Zee News

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