Brain myths hampering teaching worldwide

Myths about the brain are common among teachers worldwide and are hampering teaching, noted a study that called for better communication between neuroscientists and educators.  

Brain myths hampering teaching worldwide

London: Myths about the brain are common among teachers worldwide and are hampering teaching, noted a study that called for better communication between neuroscientists and educators.

Over 70 percent of teachers in all countries wrongly believe a student is either left-brained or right-brained, peaking at 91 percent in Britain, the findings showed.

A quarter or more of teachers in Britain and Turkey believe a student's brain would shrink if they drank less than six to eight glasses of water a day.

Around half or more of those surveyed believe a student's brain is only 10 percent active and that children are less attentive after consuming sugary drinks and snacks.

"These ideas are often sold to teachers as based on neuroscience - but modern neuroscience cannot be used support them," said Paul Howard-Jones, author of the article from University of Bristol in Britain.

"These ideas have no educational value and are often associated with poor practice in the classroom," Howard-Jones added.

The findings appeared in the journal Nature Reviews Neuroscience.

 

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