Global warming not high priority for Americans: Survey

While most Americans say the US ought to take a leadership role in combating global warming, they personally show low concern for it in comparison to other environmental issues, a survey has found.

Washington: While most Americans say the US ought to take a leadership role in combating global warming, they personally show low concern for it in comparison to other environmental issues, a survey has found.

Few Americans believe that protecting the environment needs to come at a cost of lost economic growth, showed the findings of the inaugural environment poll by The Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies and The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.

Fifty six percent of Americans believe global warming is happening, and 20 percent believe it is not happening. Almost a quarter, 23 percent, are unsure, the findings showed.

The poll surveys a nationally representative sample of US adults and provides a portrait of what the public thinks and feels about environmental issues, and what actions they are taking as consumers.

"Public understanding of environmental issues--from global warming to water pollution to the loss of biodiversity--is more important than ever, as many Americans work to create a more sustainable future," said Anthony Leiserowitz, a research scientist and faculty member at The Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies.

The Yale - AP-NORC partnership was established in 2014 to conduct rigorous and innovative research on the American public's perspectives on enduring and current environmental issues.