Remains found in Vergina confirmed to be of Alexander the Great's Father's

Greek researchers have recently confirmed that the remains found in a two-chambered royal tomb at Vergina belong to Alexander the Great's Father, Macedonian King Philip II.

Washington: Greek researchers have recently confirmed that the remains found in a two-chambered royal tomb at Vergina belong to Alexander the Great's Father, Macedonian King Philip II.

The anthropological investigation examined 350 bones and fragments found in two larnakes, or caskets, of the tomb and they also uncovered pathologies; activity markers and trauma that helped identify the tomb's occupants, Discovery News reported.

Theodore Antikas, head of the Art-Anthropological research team of the Vergina excavation said that along with the cremated remains of Philip II, the burial, commonly known as Tomb II, also contained the bones of a woman warrior, possibly the daughter of the Skythian King Athea.

He had signs of chronic pathology on the visceral surface of several low thoracic ribs, indicating pleuritis, he further added.

Scholars have argued over those bones ever since Greek archaeologist Manolis Andronikos discovered the tomb in 1977-78.