This South Korean world leader in pet cloning can immortalize your dogs!

Sooam Biotech Research Foundation is a world leader in pet cloning, with a clientele that boasts of princes, celebrities from all walks of life and billionaires.

Last Updated: Jul 04, 2016, 15:34 PM IST
This South Korean world leader in pet cloning can immortalize your dogs!
(Image for representational purposes only)

Seoul: Keeping pets has a huge impact on the pet owners' lives. The love, warmth and care is unconditional and no one would want to give this up.

But, the circle of life goes on and the magnitude of that loss is something only a pet owner can truly comprehend.

However, it seems that Sooam Biotech Research Foundation in Seoul has the best solution to keep a man's best friend in a man's life forever.

Sooam Biotech Research Foundation is a world leader in pet cloning, with a clientele that boasts of princes, celebrities from all walks of life and billionaires.

The foundation has run a thriving commercial business over the past decade catering to dog owners who want to live with their pets forever.

With cloning services that promise the perfect replacement for a lost pet, the facility has cloned over 800 dogs since 2006, commissioned by owners or state agencies seeking to replicate their best sniffer and rescue dogs.

“These people have very a strong bond with their pets ... and cloning provides a psychological alternative to the traditional method of just letting the pet go and keeping their memory,” said Wang Jae-Woong, a researcher and spokesman for Sooam.

“With cloning, you have a chance to bring back the pets,” he said in the facility’s “care room” where each cloned puppy is kept in a glass-fronted, temperature-controlled pen and monitored by researchers around the clock.

Sooam Biotech clones many animals, including cattle and pigs for medical research and breed preservation, but is best known for its commercial dog service.

The process involves harvesting a mature cell from the dog to be copied and transferring its DNA to a donor egg cell that has had its own genetic material removed.

The cell and the egg are “fused” with an electrical jolt, and the resulting embryo is implanted in a surrogate mother dog, which will give birth about two months later.

(With agency inputs)