Violence in primitive human society not driven by war
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Last Updated: Friday, July 19, 2013, 12:51
  
London: Violence in early human communities was driven by personal conflicts and not from large-scale battles, researchers have suggested.

According to researchers from Abo Academy University in Finland, war is not an innate part of human nature, but was adopted more recently.

Author of the study, Patrik Soderberg, said that their research questions the idea that large-scale battle was ever-present in our ancestral past, the BBC reported.

He said that the study paints another image where the quarrels and aggression were primarily about personal conflicts such as family feuds or adultery, instead of groups fighting against each other.

The research findings have been based on isolated tribes from around the world that were studied over the last century.

These tribes, cut off from modern life and surviving off wild plants and animals, live similar to the way hunter gatherers of thousands of years ago used to live.

He explained that about 12,000 years ago, assumption has been made that all humans were living in similar kind of society, and that these kind of societies made up about for about 90 percent of the evolutionary path.

Using the tribes as an analogy for the primitive society, researchers looked at cases where violent deaths had taken place.

They were able to find just 148 such deaths but few of these were caused by war.

Soderberg added that as humans settled down, then large battles become more dominant and present and for the modern tribals, war has not yet entered the picture.

The study has been published in the journal Science.

ANI


First Published: Friday, July 19, 2013, 12:50


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