B`desh Border Guards to abolish last mutiny stained battalion

Last Updated: Wednesday, October 24, 2012 - 15:01

Dhaka: Bangladesh is set to abolish its last mutiny-stained battalion of the frontier force as part of a massive overhaul to overcome the stigma of the 2009 mutiny, officials said on Wednesday.

"Three of the (mutiny-stained) battalions have been abolished earlier while the fourth one, the 44 Battalion, is set to be abolished early next month on completion of due processes," paramilitary Border Guard Bangladesh (BGB) director general Major General Anwar Hossain said.

He, however, said four new battalions have been raised with fresh recruitment of nearly 10,000 soldiers to replenish the border force`s strength after the abolishment of the 24th, 13nth, 36th and 44th battalions.
Dhaka: Bangladesh is set to abolish its last mutiny-stained battalion of the frontier force as part of a massive overhaul to overcome the stigma of the 2009 mutiny, officials said on Wednesday.

"Three of the (mutiny-stained) battalions have been abolished earlier while the fourth one, the 44 Battalion, is set to be abolished early next month on completion of due processes," paramilitary Border Guard Bangladesh (BGB) director general Major General Anwar Hossain said.

He, however, said four new battalions have been raised with fresh recruitment of nearly 10,000 soldiers to replenish the border force`s strength after the abolishment of the 24th, 13nth, 36th and 44th battalions.

All these four battalions were stationed at the paramilitary force`s Pilkhana headquarters, the scene of carnage where 74 people including 57 army officers were killed.

The BGB chief`s comments came as the force earlier this week concluded internal trial of the rebel soldiers for command breaches in paramilitary courts under BDR Act though the trial of the core carnage suspects and mutiny masterminds was still underway in a civil sessions judge`s court under the country`s Penal Code.

With the completion of the mutiny trials, a total of 6,011 rebel soldiers, who belonged to 57 BGB units across the country were tried in 11 special paramilitary courts under the BDR Act which prescribes the highest seven years of imprisonment.

Accomplishing the trial of 56 units the paramilitary courts handed down jail terms of different terms to 5,926 rebel soldiers and freed 112 finding them "not guilty" of the mutiny charges.

Eleven of the units including the four abolished battalions were stationed at Pilkhana.

The reconstruction campaign also saw the renaming of the force as BGB and changed law for the border force with provision for death penalty for mutiny while the process also introduced new uniform, flag and monogram for the border guards as part of desperate efforts to free them from the rebellion stigma.

PTI



First Published: Wednesday, October 24, 2012 - 15:00

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