Civilian deaths in Afghanistan shot up by 22 percent in 2014: UN

The United Nations (UN) has raised an alarm by saying that the number of civilian deaths in Afghanistan rose by 22 percent in 2014.

ANI| Updated: Feb 19, 2015, 11:12 AM IST

London: The United Nations (UN) has raised an alarm by saying that the number of civilian deaths in Afghanistan rose by 22 percent in 2014.

While a total of 3,699 Afghans killed, 6,849 were injured, making 2014 the deadliest year since the UN began recordkeeping in 2009, reported the BBC.

The report said that this was the first time that more number of civilian deaths were recorded in battles between the Taliban and government forces than by roadside bombs.

Clashes between government forces and the Taliban accounted for a third of total civilian casualties whereas roadside bombs were responsible for 28 percent deaths and injuries, UN Special Representative Nicholas Haysom said while presenting the latest figures in Kabul.

The UN figures also showed that about 15 percent people were killed in suicide attacks, while 11 percent of the total lost their lives in assassinations carried out by the Taliban.

About 500 deaths were recorded in December alone as the Taliban, who were pushed back by the U.S.-led coalition in 2001, launched a wave of attacks as foreign troops formally withdrew from the region.

The Taliban has refuted claims that they were responsible for the majority of civilian deaths in the past, terming the UN as biased.

The numbers also showed that the Afghan army and police suffered the highest recorded losses with at least 5,000 killed in 2014.

The UN has recorded about 18,000 deaths and 30,000 injuries since it began recordkeeping in 2009.