India creating `anti-Pakistan` Afghanistan: Musharraf

Pakistan`s former leader Pervez Musharraf said that India was trying to create a hostile state in Afghanistan as he hit back at criticism of his country`s role in fighting extremists.

New York: Pakistan`s former leader
Pervez Musharraf said that India was trying to create a
hostile state in Afghanistan as he hit back at criticism of
his country`s role in fighting extremists.

Musharraf, who is touring the United States as part
of a comeback bid, said he has seen photographs of Kabul-based
"Pakistan terrorists" -- a likely reference to Baluchistan
separatists -- meeting in India with intelligence agents.

"If I`m allowed to be very, very frank, India`s
role in Afghanistan is to create an anti-Pakistan
Afghanistan," Musharraf, a military ruler who stepped down in
2008, said at the Council on Foreign Relations.

"This is very clear to me. There are consulates in
Kandahar and Jalalabad (which) are actually involved in
creating trouble in Pakistan. They have no other role,"
Musharraf said.

"Why wouldn`t the consulates be somewhere in the
north facing Uzbekistan and Tajikistan?" he asked.

India has consulates in the southern cities of
Kandahar and Jalalabad -- but also in Mazar-i-Sharif in the
north and Herat in the west. The Indian embassy in Kabul was
targetted in an attack last year claimed by Taliban militants.

Pakistan has long voiced concern about India`s role
in Afghanistan. US officials have given little credence to the
assertions, with President Barack Obama in a speech Monday to
the Indian parliament praising New Delhi`s assistance to the
war-torn country.

India, not a traditional donor, has committed USD
1.3 billion to Afghanistan since the fall of the Taliban
regime and is building roads, power lines and a new parliament
building.

Pakistan had been the chief supporter of the
Taliban but Musharraf switched sides after the September 11,
2001 attacks and assisted US forces that overthrew the
hardline regime.

Musharraf bristled at criticism that Taliban and
al Qaeda leaders -- including perhaps Osama bin Laden -- have
been able to escape US-led forces in Afghanistan by crossing
into safe havens in Pakistan`s lawless border areas.

"Pakistan is trying its best. Why is the
responsibility only on Pakistan?" Musharraf said. "Why is the
responsibility of their coming into Pakistan not the fault of
Afghan forces and US forces and coalition forces?"

"It should be shared at least 50-50 -- we are at
fault, you are also at fault," he said.

PTI

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