Musharraf resigned under deal to give him safe passage: Gilani

Former Pakistan prime minister Yusuf Raza Gilani claimed that the current government was violating a deal under which Pervez Musharraf tendered his resignation from the president`s office in exchange for a safe passage.

PTI| Last Updated: Jul 11, 2014, 23:32 PM IST

Karachi: Former Pakistan prime minister Yusuf Raza Gilani on Friday claimed that the current government was violating a deal under which Pervez Musharraf tendered his resignation from the president`s office in exchange for a safe passage.

Gilani claimed that former military ruler Musharraf was to be given a safe passage under the deal made by different political parties with the then establishment.

Gilani, who is facing corruption cases in courts in Karachi, told a news conference that the current PML-N government was violating the deal under which Musharraf tendered his resignation from the president`s office.
"The truth is this deal was between the Establishment, the Pakistan Peoples Party and the PML-N," he told reporters.

Gilani was the Prime Minister in the PPP government between 2008 to 2013.

"The Establishment and some political parties agreed that if Musharraf stepped down he would get a safe passage," Gilani said.

"I don`t know why the PML-N government is violating this deal. It is uncalled for and should have been avoided because a commitment was made and should have been honoured," he said.
Gilani said Musharraf, 70, should have been given a safe passage as the PML-N government had endorsed the deal.

"It was decided to give Musharraf a safe passage without any hurdles. The PML-N leadership had also endorsed this idea. All those who were part of the negotiation with the establishment on Musharraf`s departure should abide by the agreement," he said.

"Now, the PML N government has started opening new cases against Mushrraf, which I think is not good omen," Gilani said.

Federal Information Minister Pervez Rasheed, however, rubbished Gilani`s claims, saying, "If such a deal was made we were not part of it."

"And as far as we are concerned the courts will decide on the cases against Musharraf," Rasheed said.

Musharraf, who returned to Pakistan in March last year ahead of the general elections ending his over four-year self-imposed exile, has faced multiple trials including one under the high-treason act for which he was placed under house arrest and barred from travelling abroad.

He is facing treason trial for abrogating the constitution in 2007 when he declared emergency.

Musharraf is also facing trial in the murder cases of former prime minister Benazir Bhutto; former chief minister of the southwestern Baluchistan region Nawab Akbar Bugti and Red Mosque cleric Abdul Rasheed Ghazi.

The Supreme Court has disallowed Musharraf to travel abroad for treatment for a spinal problem.