'Nepal govt must talk to Madhesi people to end the violence'

 Nepal government must not suppress the rights of Madhesi people in the new Constitution and instead create a conducive environment for holding talks with the protesters to end the deadly violence in areas close to the Indian border, a senior Madhesi leader today said.

PTI| Updated: Sep 24, 2015, 19:48 PM IST

Kathmandu: Nepal government must not suppress the rights of Madhesi people in the new Constitution and instead create a conducive environment for holding talks with the protesters to end the deadly violence in areas close to the Indian border, a senior Madhesi leader today said.

Rameshwar Raya Yadav, senior vice president of Madhesi People's Rights Forum Democratic (MPRF-D), blamed the three main political parties for the crisis that has ensnared Nepal.

The leaders of Nepali Congress, CPN-UML and UCP-Maoist are responsible for the present political crisis in Nepal, Yadav told PTI at a hospital here, where his elder son is recuperating after he was seriously wounded in police firing.

A day after Sunday's promulgation of the new Constitution, Yadav's son was hit in the neck by a bullet when police opened fire to control protesters in his home district Sarlahi, close to Bihar's Sitamarhi district.

The incident occurred when Madhesi activists set on fire the house of lawmaker Kamala Devi Mahato of the ruling Communist Party of Nepal-Unified Marxist?Leninist (CPN-UML).

"We are not against holding talks, but suppression and use of force cannot solve the problem," said Yadav, whose party commands 14 seats in the 601-member Constituent Assembly.
Yadav said the police should not indiscriminately fire on unarmed people. The government must talk to all parties, try to address the demands and resolve it politically, he said.

Mahato, who was also at the hospital to check on Yadav's son, said top leaders of the three major parties are holding meetings to find a way out and that she is confident that "the issue will be resolved through peaceful means of dialogue."

Yesterday, Nepal's Prime Minister Sushil Koirala cancelled his US visit for the UN General Assembly session to talk to Madhesi and other regional groups opposed to the Constitution.
Since the new Constitution, Nepal's Terai regions (plains) have been on the boil. More than 40 people have died in southern and western Nepal in the protests.

Madhesis, the Indian-origin inhabitants of the plains, have opposed the Constitution, saying it doesn't protect their interests. And Tharu ethnic groups claim splitting Nepal into seven provinces does not take into account their distribution.