Pakistan to blame for NATO attack, says daily

A similar strike on September 2010 left two Pakistani soldiers dead and 11 others died in June 2008.

Islamabad: Pakistan`s tactic of aligning with the "good" Taliban while pledging to fight the militants is what led to the attack by NATO that killed two dozen Pakistani soldiers, a daily said on Sunday.
As anger swept through Pakistan over the Saturday attack on a border check post, a news daily said that Pakistan`s double game had upset both the NATO and US armies.

"We promised to tackle the militants who have free rein to cross the border at any time and attack US targets in Afghanistan," it said in an editorial.

"However, what we did not tell them was that we were going to have a little fun of our own -- we were going to play the double game in the name of `strategic depth`.

"By aiding and abetting the `good` Taliban (those militants not attacking the Pakistani state) in the hopes of (giving them) a prominent place at the power sharing table in Afghanistan after the US withdrawal in 2014, we have disillusioned the US and NATO forces."

The daily said that Pakistan would now have great difficulty "to convince the US of our sincerity, especially after Osama bin Laden was found hiding comfortably in Abbottabad".

The news daily also said the "only way to prevent cross border attacks is to tackle the militants as promised".

An editorial called the killings an "unfortunate" incident and admitted that Mohmand, where the Pakistani check post was attacked, was an area through which "militants do cross the border".

It said the need of the hour was "more cooperation, not less" between the West and Pakistan.

"But the mistrust that an incident like this can foster will do nothing to bring that about," it warned.

Saturday`s was the deadliest of attacks by Western forces on Pakistani military along the rugged border with Afghanistan where Western forces are battling an aggressive Taliban.

A similar strike on September 2010 left two Pakistani soldiers dead and 11 others died in June 2008.

IANS

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