People in glass houses shouldn`t throw stones: Sri Lanka tells UK

Sri Lanka President Mahinda Rajapaksa said that no inquiry will be conducted under any pressure and that the country will take its own time to investigate into the allegations.

By Supriya Jha | Last Updated: Nov 17, 2013, 14:34 PM IST

Zee Media Bureau

Colombo: Refusing to accede to British Prime Minister David Cameron`s call for an inquiry into the human rights abuse, Sri Lanka President Mahinda Rajapaksa said that no inquiry will be conducted under any pressure and that the country will take its own time to investigate into the allegations.

Also, in a retort directed at British human rights record, Rajapaksa said that `people in glass houses shouldn`t throw stones`.

He was referring to the Bloody Sunday, when 13 civilians were shot dead in Northern Ireland by the British army in 1972, reported the BBC.

Speaking on the second day of Commonwealth summit in Sri Lanka, Rajapaksa sought to hit back at the UK, saying, that British investigations into the Bloody Sunday took 40 years to emerge.

Rajapaksa also sought to justify the government`s role saying, that the end of the war against LTTE had brought stability and peace to Sri Lanka.

"Every day for the last 30 years, people were dying... so we have stopped it", he said.

"We will take our time and we will investigate into 30 years of war," he added.

Rajapaksa`s comments came after UK PM David Cameron visited Jaffna and urged the Lankan government for "credible, transparent and independent internal inquiry" into the alleged human rights abuse in the last phase of the 37-year old war against LTTE in 2009.

Cameron set the deadline of March next year for the government inquiry to start failing which he said, he will move the UN Human Rights Commission for an independent inquiry.
After his historic visit to Jaffna, Cameron met Sri Lankan President Mahinda Rajapaksa and said he had a "free and frank" discussion on all issues including an independent and credible probe, reconciliation and rehabilitation of Tamils.

"I told President Rajapaksa that there is need for a credible, transparent and independent internal inquiry into the events at the end of the war (against LTTE) by the end of March. If that does not happen I will use our position to move the UN Human Rights Commission and work with the Rights Commissioner for an independent inquiry "Cameron told a press conference on the sidelines of the CHOGM summit here.

Ultimately it is about Sri Lanka`s reconciliation with the affected Tamils of the northern province and rehabilitation of the people displaced by the war, he said.
On March deadline for inquiry, Cameron said the President told him that he needed time as they were still recovering from the effects of the war.