Suu Kyi`s Myanmar opposition party protests dissolution

Myanmar opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi`s party protested against its dissolution by authorities in the military-ruled country for its boycott of the first election in 20 years.

Last Updated: Sep 15, 2010, 21:03 PM IST

Yangon: Myanmar opposition leader Aung
San Suu Kyi`s party on Wednesday protested against its dissolution by
authorities in the military-ruled country for its boycott of
the first election in 20 years.

State media, quoting the election commission, reported
late yesterday that the National League for Democracy had been
abolished under controversial poll rules for failing to
re-register ahead of the November 7 vote.

Although the dissolution automatically took effect in
May it was the first time that authorities have formally
announced the ban on the NLD, along with nine other parties.

"The commission has no right or authority over the
organisations which did not register with them," the NLD`s
long-time spokesman Nyan Win told reporters at the party`s
headquarters.

The NLD had not committed any breach of the 1988
political party registration law, under which it was formed,
that would warrant its dissolution, he added.

The party opted to boycott the upcoming election due
to new rules that would have forced it to expel its own leader
and other members who are serving prisoners in order to
participate.

The vote has been widely condemned by activists and
the West as a charade aimed at putting a civilian face on
military rule.

Nobel Peace Laureate Suu Kyi has spent most of the
past 20 years in detention, and as a serving prisoner is
barred from standing in the poll.

The NLD -- which won a landslide victory in 1990 but
was never allowed to take office -- is planning to sue the
government over its dissolution and the previous unrecognised
poll win.

"This process is still ongoing," Nyan Win said. "We
will carry on through peaceful political means."

Four other parties were also dissolved for failing to
re-register while five more -- out of 42 that were initially
allowed to run -- were abolished because they failed to meet
requirements on fielding candidates.

Opposition parties have faced formidable hurdles,
including a fee of 500 dollars per candidate -- the equivalent
of several months` wages for most people -- and a tight
timetable to register people to stand.

The National Democracy Force, a breakaway opposition
party created by former NLD members, is among those planning
to contest the vote, a decision that put it at odds with Suu
Kyi, who was in favour of a boycott by the NLD.

PTI