Exotic nature of 4 planets orbiting nearby star revealed

Last Updated: Wednesday, March 13, 2013 - 12:57

Washington: Using a new high-tech gadget, astronomers have observed four planets orbiting a star relatively close to the sun in unprecedented detail, revealing the roughly ten-Jupiter-mass planets to be among the most exotic ones known.

The findings were made possible by a first-of-its-kind telescope imaging system that allowed the astronomers to pick out the planets amidst the bright glare of their parent star and measure their spectra-the rainbows of light that reveal the chemical signatures of planetary atmospheres.

The system, dubbed Project 1640, enables astronomers to observe and characterize these kinds of planetary systems quickly and routinely, which has never been done before, the team, which includes several researchers from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), said.

"These warm, red planets are unlike any other known objects in our universe," said Ben R. Oppenheimer, an astronomer at the American Museum of Natural History and the paper`s lead author.

And the planets are very different from one another as well.

"All four planets have different spectra and all four are peculiar," Oppenheimer noted.

Astronomers had previously taken images of these four planets, which orbit a star called HR 8799, located 128 light years away. But because a star`s light is tens of millions to billions of times brighter than the light from that star`s own planets, distinguishing planet light from starlight so as to directly measure the spectra from the planets alone is difficult.
"It`s like taking a single picture of the Empire State Building from an airplane that reveals the height of the building but also a bump on the sidewalk next to it that is as high as a couple of bacteria," Oppenheimer explains.

"Furthermore, we`ve been able to do this over a range of wavelengths in order to make a spectrum," he stated.

In the past, astronomers have been able to take spectra of some planets that pass in front of, or transit, their stars. But with Project 1640, which uses the Hale Telescope at Caltech`s Palomar Observatory in Southern California, astronomers can now take the direct spectra of planets orbiting other stars-called exoplanets-that are not transiting.

The device blocks the otherwise overwhelming starlight, picks out the faint specks that are planets, and obtains their spectra. Project 1640 allowed the team to take spectra of all four of the planets around HR 8799 simultaneously, which had never been done for any planetary system before.

The planets around HR 8799 are at about the same distance from that star as the solar system`s gas giants (Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune) are from our sun. But since it`s easier to detect transiting planets that are close to their stars, the transiting systems that astronomers have observed have small orbits-often smaller than Mercury`s. The new results, therefore, represent the first spectra to be taken of gas giants located so far from their stars-a distance at which the influence of the stars` radiation, flares, and other features are weaker.

"We are now technically capable of obtaining spectra of giant planets in planetary systems like our own, improving on the close-in transiting planet studies done previously," said Lynne Hillenbrand, professor of astronomy at Caltech and a coauthor of the paper. And what the spectra show is that the planets are quite strange.

"A remarkable thing about these planets is their unexpected spectroscopic diversity," Hillenbrand added.

One of the most striking abnormalities is an apparent chemical imbalance. Under most circumstances, ammonia and methane should naturally coexist in a planet`s atmosphere-where there is one, there is usually the other-unless they are generated in extremely cold or hot environments. Yet the spectra of the HR 8799 planets, all of which have "lukewarm" temperatures of about 1000 Kelvin (1340 degrees Fahrenheit), either have methane or ammonia alone, with little or no sign of their chemical partner. There is also evidence of other chemicals such as acetylene-which has never before been detected on any exoplanet-and carbon dioxide.

The planets also are "redder"-they emit longer wavelengths of light-than celestial objects with similar temperatures. This could be explained by the presence of significant but patchy cloud cover on the planets , the researchers said.

HR 8799 itself is very different from our sun, with 1.6 times its mass and five times its brightness. The brightness of this distant star can vary by as much as 8 percent over a period of two days; it produces about 1,000 times more ultraviolet light than the sun. All of these factors could induce complex weather and sooty hazes that would, in turn, cause periodic changes in the spectra.

More data are needed to further explore this solar system`s unusual characteristics, the scientists noted.

The team described its findings in a paper accepted for publication by the Astrophysical Journal.

ANI



First Published: Wednesday, March 13, 2013 - 12:57

More from zeenews

 
comments powered by Disqus