New radio telescope to warn of solar storms beforehand

Last Updated: Saturday, December 1, 2012 - 16:48

Washington: A newly-unveiled radio telescope will give the world a dramatically improved view of the Sun and provide early warning to prevent damage to communication satellites, electric power grids and GPS navigation systems, it has been claimed.

The 51-million-dollar Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) radio telescope will be able to detect and monitor massive solar storms, such as the one that cut power to six million people in Canada in 1989 during the last peak in solar activity.

In 2011, experts warned that a major solar storm could result in damage to integral power supplies and communication networks of up to US 2 trillion dollars - the equivalent of a global Hurricane Katrina.

The MWA will aim to identify the trajectory of solar storms, quadrupling the warning period currently provided by near-Earth satellites. This is timely as the Sun is due to re-enter peak activity in 2013, with a dramatic increase in the number and severity of solar storms expected, with the potential to disrupt global communications and ground commercial airlines.

The completion of the MWA realises eight years of work by an international consortium of 13 institutions across four countries (Australia, USA, India and New Zealand), led by Curtin University.

The Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory was chosen by the consortium because it is the world’s best location for low frequency radio astronomy. The site has also been selected as the future home for a major part of the Square Kilometre Array.

“The MWA will keep watch on the Sun during the upcoming period of maximum solar activity. It has the potential to deliver very real and immediate benefits to the entire global population. It is a tremendous achievement and testament to the innovative technologies that have been developed to support this instrument,” Director of the MWA and Professor of Radio Astronomy at Curtin University, Steven Tingay, said.

The MWA is ground-breaking in other ways too – it will offer scientists an unprecedented view of the entire history of the Universe, to gain a better understanding of how the early Universe formed and the relationship between gravity and dark matter evolved, including how the very first stars and galaxies formed.

“Understanding how the dramatic transformation took place soon after the Big Bang, over 13 billion years ago, is the final frontier for astrophysicists like me. It has taken eight years to get to this point and it is incredibly exciting to have completed construction and to be collecting scientific data from the MWA,” Tingay said.

“Preliminary testing, using only a fraction of the MWA’s capability, has already achieved results that are on par with the best results ever achieved in the search for the first stars and galaxies.

“We anticipate a 10-fold improvement in performance when the full capabilities of the MWA are pressed into service in early 2013,” Professor Tingay told a group of eminent scientists and VIPs who had travelled from all over the world to attend the telescope’s unveiling,” he aid.

The Murchison Widefield Array will have four primary areas of scientific investigation - as well as looking back into the time to the early Universe, soon after the Big Bang, and its in-depth study of the Sun - Earth connection, the data produced by the telescope will also be used to better understand our galaxy and distant galaxies, as well as violent and explosive phenomena in the Universe.

The MWA has been supported by both State and Federal Government funding, with the majority of federal funding administered by Astronomy Australia Limited.

The MWA project recognises the Wadjarri Yamatji people as the traditional owners of the site on which the MWA is built and thanks the Wadjarri Yamatji people for their support.

ANI



First Published: Saturday, December 1, 2012 - 16:48

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