Stunning NASA video shows gigantic sun eruption

NASA`s sun-observing IRIS spacecraft has captured its first stunning close-up of a colossal coronal mass ejection (CME) erupting from the sun.

IANS| Last Updated: Jun 01, 2014, 16:05 PM IST

California: NASA`s sun-observing IRIS spacecraft has captured its first stunning close-up of a colossal coronal mass ejection (CME) erupting from the sun.

The field of view for this imagery is about five times the width of earth and about seven-and-half times its length, a tremendous sheet of solar material can be seen erupting in a latest video released by NASA.

The view is unprecedented for IRIS which was launched in June last year to observe the lowest levels of the sun`s atmosphere with better resolution than ever before.
IRIS must commit to pointing at certain areas of the sun at least a day in advance, so catching a CME in the act involves some educated guesses and a little bit of luck.

"We focus in on active regions to try to see a flare or a CME. And then we wait and hope that we will catch something. This is the first clear CME for IRIS, so the team is very excited," said Bart de Pontieu, the IRIS science lead at Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory in Palo Alto, California.

The video, available on NASA`s web site, shows how solar material erupts outward at speeds of 1.5 million miles per hour.

Put narcissists in others` shoes to arouse empathy
London: People with narcissistic tendencies can feel empathy for another person`s suffering if they are persuaded to take that person`s perspective.
"If we encourage narcissists to consider the situation from their teammate or friend`s point of view, they are likely to respond in a much more considerate and sympathetic way," said Erica Hepper from University of Surrey in Britain.

The researchers studied participants in three different situations and found that individuals high in narcissism were capable of higher empathy when instructed to take that person`s perspective.

This result was further tested via the participants` heart beats, as increases in heart rate are known to indicate an empathic response to other people`s emotions and suffering.

"This is not only good for the people around them, but also for their own well being in the long-run as empathy helps to form and maintain close relationships," Hepper added.

The study appeared in the journal Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin.