11-year-old UK girl has higher IQ than Einstein

Last Updated: Monday, August 5, 2013 - 16:11

London: An 11-year-old schoolgirl in the UK has achieved the highest possible score of 162 on a Mensa IQ test, making her brainier than scientists Stephen Hawking and Albert Einstein.

Cerys Cooksammy-Parnell, the grade six schoolgirl took up the Mensa IQ test with the aim of beating her father`s score of 142.

Surprisingly, Parnell not only trounced her father in the test but also scored the highest mark possible in the test, scoring 162 on the Cattell B scale, `The Daily Express` reported.

Cerys, from Northampton, UK, took the supervised test on July 27 this year with her father Dean, who is already a member of the genius group Mensa and has an IQ of 142.

"My primary aim was to beat my dad who is very smart but I didn`t expect to beat him by such a huge margin," She said.

"I am not sure if this score is a good thing or a bad thing as I know she will be questioning everything I tell her to do. We are a bit blown away," Dean, a lawyer, said.

Cerys is one of the youngest people to have taken the test as it is only offered to children aged over 10 and a half, the report said.

Cerys says she loves pop music, texting her friends and watching TV.
"At 11, I do not have many intellectual discussions with my friends and to be honest there is more to a person than their IQ," she said.

"I like working with numbers so I think I would like to work for a bank or even one day become the Governor of the Bank of England," she said.

Cerys has been invited to join British Mensa`s 21,000 members, who all have IQ scores in the top two per cent of the country`s population.
"Cerys` score shows that she has great potential," John Stevenage, chief executive of British Mensa, said.

Although, Einstein never took an IQ test as none of the modern intelligence tests existed during the course of his life, but experts believe he had an IQ of around 160.
PTI



First Published: Monday, August 5, 2013 - 16:11

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