Asiana Airlines crash: `Tail ripped off`, survivors recount horror

Last Updated: Sunday, July 7, 2013 - 15:10

Washington: Samsung executive David Eun, who survived the San Francisco plane crash, described himself on his Twitter profile as being an `all-American Korean` a `pensive optimist` and a frequent flier.

Eun tweeted his experience after he found himself bracing for life as something went terribly wrong in the landing.
"I just crash landed at SFO. Tail ripped off. Most everyone seems fine. I`m ok. Surreal ..." Eun wrote on his Twitter account.

According to CNN, other passengers on the plane also described a harrowing experience.

Elliott Stone could see the tarmac below him. He said the back of the plane broke off, that is where several flight attendants were sitting.

Several people watched the plane crash from the airport or other nearby areas.
Dan Glickman said that everything looked normal at first. The plane was coming into the airport Saturday in a routine flight pattern. But then the wheels seemed too low too soon.

Glickman told CNN affiliate KTVU that it just pancaked immediately. It collapsed and then it slid.

Danielle Wells, who also saw the plane crash, said on Twitter that he cannot stop crying and cannot believe this.

According to the report, Kristina Stapchuck saw the crash from a window seat on another plane. She saw Flight 214 rock back and forth and the tail come off.

She said that other parts came off and shattered everywhere on the runway. It looked like the plane was sliding on its belly all the way down the runway, the report said.

Two people were killed and at least 40 critically injured after a Boeing 777 passenger jetliner arriving from South Korea crashed and caught fire while landing at San Francisco International Airport.

It was not immediately clear what happened to the Asiana Airlines plane from Seoul, but initial reports indicate that the tail broke off from some impact.

ANI



First Published: Sunday, July 7, 2013 - 13:20

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