close
This ad will auto close in 10 seconds

Australia, NZ mark 100 years since first troops left for WWI

Australia and New Zealand on Saturday marked 100 years since their first convoy of troops left for the battlefields of World War I, with thousands attending events to commemorate the "heavy day in history".



Sydney: Australia and New Zealand on Saturday marked 100 years since their first convoy of troops left for the battlefields of World War I, with thousands attending events to commemorate the "heavy day in history".

The convoy left the Western Australian town of Albany on November 1, 1914, carrying 20,000 Australian and 8,500 New Zealand soldiers bound for Gallipoli in modern day Turkey and later the battlefields of Europe.

"It was a heavy day in our history and it led to even heavier times to come," Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott said in remarks welcoming New Zealand leader John Key to the country.

"All were sailing into history," Abbott told a commemorative service overlooking the ocean, referring to the convoy.

"The first World War was the crucible in which the Australian identity was forged. In 1914 we were a country with a flag and a parliament but little sense of nationhood.

"The baptism of fire that was the Great War changed all that. The scale of sacrifice and loss was beyond anything imaginable."

Losses in Gallipoli were hard, with the offensive claiming the lives of more than 11,000 New Zealand and Australian troops in a matter of months, although worse battles were to follow in the Great War, Key said.

"In a war that engulfed the world, our young nations were among the hardest hit. No community, rural or urban, was left untouched by loss," Key said.

"But the service, and sacrifice, of those who fought for us -- would play a critical role in forging our national identities.

"Our experiences in the First World War marked an important point in our coming of age as countries. They made us look at who we were, and we came from colonies to became nations," Key said. Before the service thousands had lined the streets of Albany for a commemorative troop march, while a symbolic departure of a flotilla of naval warships from King George Sound was to follow later Saturday.

Albany in the far south of Western Australia was the gathering point for ships carrying the Australian Imperial Force and New Zealand Expeditionary Force which were later to become known as the `Anzacs`.

The first convoy was joined at sea two days later by two ships carrying more Australian troops along with the Japanese cruiser HIJMS Ibuki.

"Japan`s involvement in the Albany convoy is one of the lesser known stories of Australia`s defence cooperation with Japan," Australia`s Defence Minister David Johnston said in a statement.

Japanese and New Zealand ships alongside French troops are also set to participate in this weekend`s commemorations in Albany.

"On days such as this we do not glorify war but we do acknowledge the selflessness and comradeship of shared struggle," Abbott told the service.

"Today we also remember all those we fought with, the soldiers and sailors of the countries of the British empire, of gallant France, and of Japan, first an ally, then a foe, now the very best of friends.

"We remember them all. They are all gone now. Gone, but never forgotten by the nation they shaped."

From Zee News

0 Comment - Join the Discussions

trending

photo gallery

video


WION FEATURES

K8 Plus: Lenovo's new phone available @ Rs 10,999

Heavy security outside Dera Sacha Sauda headquarters in Sirsa as search operation begins

WATCH Exclusive: After Doklam standoff, India begins road construction near LAC

Hurricane Irma, rampaging through Caribbean, is most enduring super-storm on record

Three train derailments in 1 day, fourth accident narrowly-averted

China says Indian Army chief's views contrary to those expressed by Modi, Xi