'Britain to curb Muslim Brotherhood operations in London'

Britain is set to impose curbs on organisations linked to Egypt's Muslim Brotherhood and block its activists from moving to London after a report by a senior diplomat raised concerns over the group's links to extremists.

London: Britain is set to impose curbs on organisations linked to Egypt's Muslim Brotherhood and block its activists from moving to London after a report by a senior diplomat raised concerns over the group's links to extremists.

Prime Minister David Cameron had asked John Jenkins, the ambassador to Saudi Arabia, to compile a dossier on the Muslim Brotherhood after Gulf allies put pressure on the government to curtail the movement's London-based operations, The Telegraph reported.

A lobbying campaign by Gulf states angry at the Muslim Brotherhood's role in the Arab Spring has seen several of its senior figures forced to leave Qatar in recent days.

Egypt and Saudi Arabia have spearheaded diplomatic pressure on host governments to shut down Muslim Brotherhood operations in Qatar, London and Istanbul.

Officials privy to the drafting of Jenkin's report said it had been handed over to Downing Street and a statement on its findings would be published before the end of the year.

While it stops short of proposing a ban on the Brotherhood, it accepts some of the movement's activity amounts to complicity with armed groups and extremists in the Middle East and elsewhere.

"We won't ban the Muslim Brotherhood. There are other things that can be done but not a ban," a Foreign Office diplomat told the daily.

A senior British official involved in the process said parts of the report are too sensitive to publish.

"It's a very comprehensive look at the activities of the Muslim Brotherhood in many countries. There have been submissions that have been given to us that are very sensitive. We couldn't go back to those places again if some of this information was put in the public domain," the official was quoted as saying.

The Muslim Brotherhood organisation was established in Egypt in 1928 and was ousted from government there last year.

The 85-year-old Islamist movement was first banned by Egypt's military rulers in 1954, but registered itself as an NGO in March 2013 in response to a court case brought by opponents who contested its legal status.

An Egyptian court last month ordered the dissolution of the Freedom and Justice Party, the political wing of the movement, in yet another crushing blow to Islamists after the ouster of president Mohammed Morsi last year.
 

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