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Camp Bucca – The American prison in Iraq that became ISIS' birthplace

The southern town of Garma has been known to be home to one of the Iraq War’s most infamous prisons. It has a huge detention centre called Camp Bucca, which in the past detained some of the Iraq War’s most radical jihadists along the Kuwait border.


Camp Bucca – The American prison in Iraq that became ISIS' birthplace

London: The southern town of Garma has been known to be home to one of the Iraq War’s most infamous prisons. It had a huge detention centre called Camp Bucca, which in the past detained some of the Iraq War’s most radical jihadists along the Kuwait border.

Around 100,000 detainees are said to have been kept in Camp Bucca. It later closed down.

The camp is now said to have been representative of an opening chapter in the history of dreaded terror group, the Islamic State of ISIS.

As per a report in a leading foreign Daily, The Independent, many of ISIS leaders including Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi spent time at Camp Bucca and in all linklihood met there.

It may just have been instrumental in the formation of the ISIS.

As per the report, nine members of the Islamic State’s top 'commanders' were jailed at the camp. They are Abu Muslim al-Turkmani, Haji Bakr, (now dead) and Abu Qasim.

According to experts, the men may have been extremists when they came to Camp Bucca but they were certainly one when they left the prison. They say that these men became hardened while doing time in prison and also increased their following there.

The report in the Daily quotes former prison commander James Skylar Gerrond, who worked there between 2006 and 2007, as writing in the micro-blogging site Twitter: “Many of us at Camp Bucca were concerned that instead of just holding detainees, we had created a pressure cooker for extremism.”

In 2007 the prison is said to have been home to 24,000 inmates. The place, as per experts, was reeling with extremism.

The report also quotes Gerrond as saying, “There was a huge amount of collective pressure exerted on detainees to become more radical in their beliefs. Detainees turned to each other for support. If there were radical elements within this support network, there was always the potential that detainees would become more radical.”

Camp Bucca had Saddam Hussein’s Baathist secularists and Islamic fundamentalists at the same time and it is said to have been the right setting for them to collaborate.

The Daily quotes Washington Post as writing that in 2009 hordes of Camp Bucca inhabitants were freed. They may have returned to Baghdad, probably with revenge on their minds.

From Zee News

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