Deaths hit 330 as Haiti fights to halt cholera outbreak

Twenty-five more fatalities have brought the toll from Haiti`s cholera epidemic to 330 dead.

Last Updated: Oct 30, 2010, 13:39 PM IST

Port-au-Prince: Twenty-five more fatalities
have brought the toll from Haiti`s cholera epidemic to 330
dead, as medical teams desperately sought to contain an
outbreak that they warned could "spread like wildfire."

Nearly 5,000 patients have overwhelmed hospitals in the
affected central regions of the country, and cases are now
suspected just 48 kilometers from the capital Port-au-Prince,
where 1.3 million people displaced by January`s catastrophic
earthquake are still living in squalid camps.

Days after cholera was confirmed in Haiti for the first
time in decades, the death rate began to slow, although one
week on it has jumped again, with health authorities
announcing 25 new deaths yesterday and 65 more people
hospitalised with the disease, for a total of 4,714.

Clinics were operating beyond capacity around the
Artibonite River, which is believed to be carrying the deadly
cholera bacteria across the country to the Caribbean coast at
Saint Marc, the outbreak`s epicenter some 96 kilometers north
of Port-au-Prince.

International aid group Save the Children said the
outbreak was threatening some 25,000 new mothers and their
babies in the hundreds of temporary camps in and around the
capital.

Days after cholera was confirmed in Haiti for the first
time in decades, the death rate began to slow, although one
week on it has jumped again, with health authorities
announcing 25 new deaths yesterday and 65 more people
hospitalised with the disease, for a total of 4,714.

Clinics were operating beyond capacity around the
Artibonite River, which is believed to be carrying the deadly
cholera bacteria across the country to the Caribbean coast at
Saint Marc, the outbreak`s epicenter some 96 kilometers north
of Port-au-Prince.

International aid group Save the Children said the
outbreak was threatening some 25,000 new mothers and their
babies in the hundreds of temporary camps in and around the
capital.