`Discrimination, not Islam behind violent youths`

Young Muslims are no more likely to be violent than non-Muslims, a report by the EU`s Fundamental Rights Agency found on, citing discrimination however as a key differentiating factor.

Vienna: Young Muslims are no more likely
to be violent than non-Muslims, a report by the EU`s
Fundamental Rights Agency (FRA) found on Wednesday, citing
discrimination however as a key differentiating factor.

In a survey of 3,000 Muslim and non-Muslim youths in
Britain, France and Spain, FRA found that young people across
the board were more likely to turn to violence if they had
suffered discrimination.

"Young people who are discriminated against and feel
socially marginalised, and those who have been a victim of
violence are more likely to use violence towards others,"
noted FRA director Morten Kjaerum.

"There are no indications that Muslim youth are more
or less likely to resort to actual violence than non-Muslims,"
added the report, which was published today.

About a quarter of those surveyed said they had
experienced discrimination, ranging from bullying to physical
violence.

But the percentage was significantly higher among
Muslims than their non-Muslim counterparts in France and
Spain, although there was little difference in Britain,
according to the report.

"There is a strong link between being a victim and an
offender," it concluded.

Even among members of delinquent groups, the
likelihood of resorting to violence was greater if they had
been exposed to bullying or aggression.

The report also found that young people did not
support violence "without a good reason," but deemed it
justified defending them or others, while one in five
found it acceptable if their religion had been insulted.
Even then, expressed support for violence was not
automatically translated into action.

"In order to tackle some of the root causes of
violence, it is important to ensure that children are not
exposed themselves to violence and discrimination," Kjaerum
appealed.

The survey was conducted in Britain, France and Spain
due to their experience with urban unrest involving youths
with an often Muslim background, as well as recent terrorist
attacks by radical Islamists.

PTI

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