Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood faces backlash

Opinion polls suggest that the Muslim Brotherhood and its Islamist allies will win more than 40 per cent of the vote in Egypt`s general elections.

Last Updated: Nov 24, 2011, 15:46 PM IST

Cairo: Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood, one of the nation’s most powerful political forces, is facing a growing backlash from protesters after it was accused of collaborating with the country`s military leaders to prevent an immediate transition to civilian rule.
Violence and chaos engulfed Cairo’s Tahrir Square after pro-reform protesters rejected a pledge from the army to hold presidential elections by next June, months sooner than expected.

But anger was also directed at the Muslim Brotherhood that negotiated a series of concessions from Egypt``s generals, who have ruled Egypt since the ouster of President Hosni Mubarak.

With the measures falling well short of protester demands for the army to hand over executive powers to a civilian cabinet with immediate effect, the Brotherhood was accused of acting out of self-interest, the Telegraph reports.

Opinion polls suggest that the Muslim Brotherhood and its Islamist allies will win more than 40 per cent of the vote, far more than any of its secular rivals, in the upcoming legislative election.

Critics claimed it had reached an accommodation with the army to ensure that the elections went ahead. But the tactic, protesters warned, was likely to misfire and could even cost the Brotherhood a significant share of the votes.

Some said they were disgruntled by their leaders`` decision to co-operate with the army.
“They should not have started negotiations while people are dying,” the paper quoted a protestor, as saying.

Fearing they have been outflanked by the Brotherhood and the army, many protesters called for secular politicians to unite and give the people of Tahrir Square one voice powerful enough to challenge two rivals they see as holding undemocratic values.

(ANI)