Greece tomb may be linked to Alexander the Great

Archaeologists excavating a burial mound in northern Greece have found two marble sculptures of female figures and a large, colored marble panel in what appears to be the antechamber of the main room.

 Athens: Archaeologists excavating a burial mound in northern Greece have found two marble sculptures of female figures and a large, colored marble panel in what appears to be the antechamber of the main room.

The tomb, in the town of Amphipolis, dates between 325 B.C. Two years before Alexander the Great's death and 300 B.C.

There is some speculation that one of his relatives or generals might be buried there. Alexander was buried in Egypt.

The 60-centimeter (2-foot) female figurines are on a wall leading to the yet unexplored main room. The marble panel, 4.2 meters (14 feet) long by 1 meter (3.3 feet) wide, is carved with geometric shapes and painted dark red and yellow. It is located up a wall in the 6.5-meter (21.3-feet) high antechamber.

 

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