Hong Kong protests: Protesters clash with police despite planned talks

Even as leaders from both the government and protest camp agreed to talk, unrest in Hong Kong refuses to die as police clashed with protesters who defied authorities by breaching barriers.

By Supriya Jha | Updated: Oct 19, 2014, 17:07 PM IST
Hong Kong protests: Protesters clash with police despite planned talks

Hong Kong: Even as leaders from both the government and protest camp agreed to talk, unrest in Hong Kong refuses to die as police clashed with protesters who defied authorities by breaching barriers.

The flashpoint district of Mong Kok saw its major thoroughfares blocked by protesters who scuffled with police, resulting in injuries on both sides. Mong Kok also saw huge traffic snarls as several main roads were closed and 76 bus routes were diverted due to Occupy Central protests, local media reports said.

Meanwhile, a young pro-democracy protests supporter was arrested by the police on suspicion of urging people to gather in Mong Kok by sending onsline messages, said a Wall Street Journal report.

Also,  Ken Tsang, the activist who was seen being brutally beaten by six cops in plain clothes in a video that went viral, on Sunday asked for a police report demanding information on those cops who had beaten him. Tsang said that if police failed to produce the report till 10 am tomorrow, he would launch a judicial review.

A 23-year-old man had been arrested Saturday on suspicion of “accessing a computer with illegal or dishonest intentions” and illegal assembly, the WSJ report quoted a statement by the Hong Kong Police Force.

The report adds that the arrest could discourage the protesters’ social media use for mobilising more protesters.

According to a tweet by Hong Kong Student Federation, police reported that some nine thousand protesters had gathered in Mong Kok last night and clashes had caused some cops to be injured.

Student protesters said that police kept attacking them with batons.

Meanwhile, both camps have agreed to talk and the dialogue for political reforms will be held next week on Tuesday.

Chief Secretary, Carrie Lam, announced that talks, which may last two hours, will be broadcast live and

The talks, which are expected to last two hours, will be broadcast live and will be held at the Hong Kong Academy of Medicine in Wong Chuk Hang.

Five officials, including Mrs Lam will negotiate with five representatives of the Federation of Students to discuss the possibilities regarding political reforms.

Hong Kong leader CY Leung had last week agreed to re-offer dialogue with the protesters after a police brutality video triggered outrage and risked fuelling the protests that had subsided in last few days.

Pro-democracy protesters started an unprecedented demonstration last month, speaking up against China's screening of candidates for first-ever elections for Hong Kong's leader scheduled for 2017.

The protesters occupied major streets in Hong Kong, demanding China to give Hong Kong unfettered freedom to select candidates for 2017 polls.

China has so far been hand-picking the leaders of Hong Kong and even this time it insists on a 1200 committee to screen three candidates for 2017 polls, based on their loyalty to China. The three chosen candidates will then be allowed to be put to vote by Hong Kongers to be their leader. However, Hong Kongers believe that China is reneging on its promise made in 2007 to grant the autonomous region full democracy.