Hong Kong's CY Leung defends police even as brutality video goes viral

Just a day after a video surfaced showing police badly beating up a social worker, Hong Kong leader CY Leung agreed to reopen talks with the protesters, however sough to defend the police, saying they had tolerated enough unlawful action.

Hong Kong's CY Leung defends police even as brutality video goes viral

Hong Kong: Just a day after a video surfaced showing police badly beating up a social worker, Hong Kong leader CY Leung agreed to reopen talks with the protesters, however sough to defend the police, saying they had tolerated enough unlawful action.

Talking to reporters, Leung said that the Government would start talks with the protesters as early as next week. He added that the government had contacted the Students' Federation via middlemen and that the University Vice Chancellor might be made the moderator.

Leung however, stressed that China's position on vetting the election candidates would not change but there was space to discuss composition of the nominating committee.

"In the second round of consultation, we can still listen to everyone's views... There is still room to discuss issues including the exact formation of the nomination committee," he was quoted as saying.

Talking about the brutal police video, which shows six cops in plain clothes beating and kicking a handcuffed social worker, Leung sought to defend the cops, saying police have been under great pressure and the issue must not be politicised.

The Occupy central tweeted Leung's remarks on police, saying not all should be painted with the same brush.

Leung had called off talks planned last week to negotiate a solution to the pro-democracy protests that has affected life in Hong Kong since last month.

Leung's sudden U-turn comes in wake of airing of the police-beating video, which shows how brutally six cops in plain clothes assaulted an unarmed and handcuffed social worker named Ken Tsang.

The video added fuel to the protests and triggered a fresh wave of anger among the protesters, activists and legislators.

Following the video's release, which went viral, China blocked the website of the BBC. China had done the same in December 2010, in wake of Chinese dissident Liu Xiaobo being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Last month, Hong Kong witnessed an unprecedented demonstration by thousands of people, protesting against China's screening of candidates for first-ever elections for Hong Kong's leader scheduled for 2017.

The protesters continue to occupy major streets in Hong Kong as they demand China to give Hong Kong unfettered freedom to select candidates for 2017 polls.

China has so far been hand-picking the leaders of Hong Kong and even this time it insists on a 1200 committee to screen three candidates for 2017 polls, based on their loyalty to China. The three chosen candidates will then be allowed to be put to vote by Hong Kongers to be their leader. However, Hong Kongers believe that China is reneging on its promise made in 2007 to grant the autonomous region full democracy.

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