John Kerry arrives in Middle East as Iraq militants make new gains

US Secretary of State John Kerry arrived in the Middle East today for talks on the Iraq crisis, as Sunni militants made new gains in an offensive that has alarmed the world.

AFP| Last Updated: Jun 22, 2014, 20:09 PM IST

Baghdad: US Secretary of State John Kerry arrived in the Middle East today for talks on the Iraq crisis, as Sunni militants made new gains in an offensive that has alarmed the world.

As Kerry landed in Cairo on a trip that will also take him to Amman, Iraqi government forces, fighting back against the insurgents after initially evaporating before their onslaught, launched air strikes on Tikrit, killing at least seven people, witnesses said.

The bombing of Tikrit, one of several cities that have fallen out of government control since the militants launched their offensive on June 9, came a day after Shiite fighters paraded in Baghdad in a dramatic show of force aimed at their Sunni opponents.

Washington`s new diplomatic bid is aimed at uniting Iraq`s fractious leaders and repelling insurgents whose lightning offensive has displaced hundreds of thousands, spooked the international community and put Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki under growing pressure.

Kerry arrived today in Cairo, where he was due to meet President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi to press the former army chief, who ousted Egypt`s first democratically elected president, to install greater political freedoms and discuss security challenges.

He was due later in Amman for talks with Jordan`s Foreign Minister Nasser Judeh before carrying on to Brussels and Paris.

State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki said Kerry would "consult with partners and allies on how we can support security, stability, and the formation of an inclusive government in Iraq".

While Kerry is also expected to travel to Iraq for his second visit since taking over as secretary of state in early 2013, it was not known when he would do so.

Washington had initially favoured Maliki when he first became prime minister in 2006 as he was seen to be cracking down on Shiite militias while reaching out to Sunni leaders.

But in recent months, he has made increasingly sectarian moves, triggering calls from US leaders to be the man for all Iraqi people - including Sunnis, Kurds and Christians.
While US leaders have stopped short of calling for Maliki to step down - arguing that it is up to the Iraqis to choose their own leaders - they have left little doubt that they feel the Shiite premier has squandered the opportunity to rebuild his country since American troops withdrew in 2011.
The Sunni insurgents driving the offensive are made up of a broad alliance of other groups, such as loyalists of executed dictator Saddam Hussein.