`Last` Bloody Sunday march in Northern Ireland town

Last Updated: Monday, January 31, 2011 - 09:05

Belfast: Thousands of people joined what was expected to be the final Londonderry march to protest Bloody Sunday, when 13 civilians were killed after British soldiers opened fire on demonstrators.

The march has been an annual event since the 1972 incident, which occurred in the city`s Bogside area.

Hundreds of mourners laid wreaths at the city`s memorial early Sunday before families of the victims walked behind a banner proclaiming "vindicated”.

Organisers said the event should now come to an end following the publication of the Saville Report, which led to an apology by British Prime Minister David Cameron in June 2010.

The statement was signed by the majority of the victims` families, though some said the action was ill-judged.

Kate Nash, whose brother William was killed in the incident, said the decision to end the march was "very premature”.

She added: "It was dropped on us like a ton of bricks, completely unexpectedly. Who decided the march should end and why?”

"The people of Derry were not afforded the opportunity of having an opinion about this and I feel they should have had."

Tony Doherty, whose father Paddy was killed on Bloody Sunday, supported the ending of the march.

"The vast majority of the families felt that what we had brought about... with the Saville Report as an exoneration, with the words of David Cameron, with apology and accepting political responsibility for the atrocity of Bloody Sunday, that it was now time for us all to consider moving on," he said.

Bureau Report



First Published: Monday, January 31, 2011 - 09:05

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