MH370 hunt introduced with real time tracking of aircraft, Malaysian Airlines urges ill-fate families to go home

Malaysia`s Transport Ministry is recommending that the International Civil Aviation Organization, examines the safety benefits of introducing a standard for real-time tracking of commercial air transport aircraft.

AFP| Last Updated: May 01, 2014, 21:36 PM IST

Kuala Lumpur: Malaysia`s Transport Ministry is recommending that the International Civil Aviation Organization, the U.N. body that oversees global aviation, examines the safety benefits of introducing a standard for real-time tracking of commercial air transport aircraft.

In a report dated April 9 but released on Thursday, the ministry pointed to the disappearance of Malaysian Airlines Flight MH370 and Air France flight AF447 in 2009 as evidence that such real-time tracking would help to better track aircraft.

"There have now been two occasions during the last five years when large commercial air transport aircraft have gone missing and their last position was not accurately known. This uncertainty resulted in significant difficulty in locating the aircraft in a timely manner," the ministry said.

Malaysia Airlines today asked distraught relatives of the 227 passengers on board the ill-fated Flight MH370 to go back to the "comfort of their own homes" as the search for the plane could be a prolonged one.

"Instead of staying in hotels, the families of MH370 are advised to receive information updates on the progress of the search and investigation and other support by Malaysia Airlines within the comfort of their own homes, with the support and care of their families and friends," the airlines said in a statement.

It said the search and investigation into the disappearance of the Boeing 777-200 could be a prolonged process.
Malaysia Airlines will be closing all of its Family Assistance Centres around the world by May 7.

However, with the support of the Malaysian government, the airlines will establish Family Support Centres in Kuala Lumpur and Beijing.

The airlines said it will keep in close touch with the families on news updates through telephone calls, messages, the Internet and face-to-face meetings.

The detailed plan of follow-up support and services will be informed in person to the families, the statement said.
Malaysia Airlines said it will make advanced compensation payments soon to the nominated next-of-kin who are entitled to claim compensation in order to meet their immediate economic needs.

Such advanced payments will not affect the rights of the next-of-kin to claim compensation according to the law at a later stage and will be calculated as part of the final compensation, the statement said.

"Immediately after the next-of-kin have returned home, our representatives will be in touch with them at the earliest opportunity to initiate the advanced compensation payment process," it said.

The Beijing-bound Malaysia Airlines flight MH370- carrying 239 people, including five Indians, an Indo-Canadian and 154 Chinese nationals - had mysteriously vanished on March 8 after taking off from Kuala Lumpur.

The mystery of the missing plane continued to baffle aviation and security authorities who have so far not succeeded in tracking the aircraft despite deploying hi-tech radar and other gadgets.
Malaysia believes the flight was deliberately diverted by someone on board and that satellite data indicates it crashed in the Indian Ocean, west of the Australian city of Perth.
The Malaysian government has so far been tight-lipped about its investigation into the disappearance of the Malaysia Airlines jet, adding to the anger and frustration among relatives of the passengers.