Obama considers fast appeal of gays-military order

Defense Secretary Robert Gates has warned of "enormous consequences" for men and women in uniform if a judge`s order abruptly allowing gays to serve openly in the military is allowed to stand.

Last Updated: Oct 14, 2010, 09:55 AM IST

Washington: Defense Secretary Robert Gates warned Wednesday of "enormous consequences" for men and women in uniform if a judge`s order abruptly allowing gays to serve openly in the military is allowed to stand.

The Obama administration may well ask for a stay of the ruling while it appeals. Justice Department officials worked behind the scenes on their response into Wednesday night with no word on when there would be an announcement. The uncertainty of the next step left gay-rights activists as well as the military in limbo over the status of the "don`t ask, don`t tell" law.

A day after a federal judge in California ordered the Pentagon to cease enforcing the law, Gates told reporters traveling with him in Europe that repeal should be a question for Congress — and only after the Pentagon completes a study of the impact of lifting the ban, which is due Dec. 1.

Allowing gays to serve openly "is an action that requires careful preparation and a lot of training," Gates said. "It has enormous consequences for our troops."

In Tuesday`s ruling, U.S. District Judge Virginia Phillips ordered the military "immediately to suspend and discontinue any investigation" or other proceeding to dismiss gay service members. The 1993 law says gays may serve in the military but only if they keep secret their sexual orientation.

Phillips wrote that the law "infringes the fundamental rights" of current and prospective service members.

Gay rights advocates cautioned gay service members to avoid revealing their sexuality for fear that the Phillips ruling could be tossed out on appeal and they would be left open to being discharged.
Defense Department officials would not say what was happening to current discharge cases, or even confirm how many pending cases there might be. A Pentagon spokesman, Col. David Lapan, said no written guidance had been issued to commanders on how to deal with the court order.

An Air Force officer and co-founder of a gay service member support group called OutServe said Wednesday he will continue using a pseudonym out of concern that he could still be discharged.
"Can I come out right now and be OK? And if I made a statement would it be held against me?" asked the officer, who calls himself JD Smith and said he is an Air Force Academy graduate. He said service members are hoping the Pentagon will clarify the meaning of the court ruling.

Bureau Report