Re-elected by Brazil, Dilma Rousseff vows to become a 'much better President'

Re-elected President of Brazil, Dilma Rousseff appeared upbeat after her election victory, oozing with hope and enthusiasm, promising her countrymen all the much needed changes and reforms and vowed to become a “much better President” than she has been until now.

Re-elected by Brazil, Dilma Rousseff vows to become a 'much better President'

Brasilia: Re-elected President of Brazil, Dilma Rousseff appeared upbeat after her election victory, oozing with hope and enthusiasm, promising her countrymen all the much needed changes and reforms and vowed to become a “much better President” than she has been until now.

A day after her triumph in the tightest election race becane clear on Sunday, Dilma appeared on a series of interviews and chat shows and was seen dishing out a generous dose of hopes and promises to Brazilians, pledging to work harder for a better future.

Speaking to Brazilian TV channel National Journal, Dilma said, “We need to hold hands and walk together to build that future we all want”.

She added that she would now open dialogue with business segments, financial, market and other sectors to steer the country on a path of growth and future.

We have to be able to ensure the changes and reforms that the country needs and demand.

Earlier, apparently upbeat over the win, Rousseff thanked Brazilian voters and especially her political mentor, ex-President Lula da Silva from the bottom of her heart.

With a huge poster of her own flashing in the background, Rousseff vowed to turn into a better president than before.

"My dears, my friends, we have arrived at the end of a campaign that intensely mobilized all the forces of this country...I thank every Brazilian, without exception."

Former President was seen wiping away drops of tears as Dilma mentioned his name while giving thanks, as she said, “I thank from the bottom of my heart, our No. 1 militant, President Lula.

Left-leaning President Dilma Rousseff was re-elected on Sunday, giving the Workers' Party its fourth-straight presidential victory and the chance to extend its social transformation of the globe's fifth-largest country.

Rousseff took 51.6 percent of the votes and center-right challenger Aecio Neves had 48.4 percent, with almost all ballots counted. The result reflected a nation deeply divided after what many called the most acrimonious campaign since the return to democracy, with charges of corruption, nepotism and ample personal barbs thrown by both sides.

The re-elected leader faces an immense challenge of reigniting a stalled economy, improving woeful public services that ignited huge anti-government protests last year, and trying to push political reforms through a highly fragmented congress where the governing coalition has less support than it did four years ago.

With Agency Inputs

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