Russians to use cell phones to settle overdue payments

Russians will be soon able to learn about their overdue payments and settle them via their cell phones, Head of the Federal Service of Bailiffs Artur Parfenchikov has said.

Moscow: Russians will be soon able to
learn about their overdue payments and settle them via their
cell phones, Head of the Federal Service of Bailiffs Artur
Parfenchikov has said.

"This option has been implemented in the Krasnodar
Region, where it is possible to learn about overdue payments
and to settle them via a text message," he said yesterday.
"Quite soon the option will be available in Russia`s other
regions."

Russians will be able to settle debts of maximum USD
493.53.

"Mostly, those would be administrative fines, including
fines for violating traffic rules."

"We offer a very convenient resource where a debtor may
learn about a fine and make the payment," Parfenchikov said.
"This form of payment reduces the corruption component."

The introduced payment option is a part of a new national
multi system information base, which will be launched "late
this year or early next year," he explained.

"The data base will contain information on overdue
payments throughout the country," he said. "We use the
Internet, cell operators and bank terminals, where a debtor
will be able to get information on overdue payments and to
settle those."

As of now, the service to learn about a debt via bank
terminals is available in St. Petersburg, Pskov and the
Volgograd Region. Very soon the option will be available in
other regions.

The Internet site of the Federal Service offers
information on overdue payments that corporates have, and by
the end of the current year about two thirds of Russia`s
territories will be able to see information on personal
debts.

Parfenchikov commented on cases of corruption among
bailiffs, saying that "over the current year we have revealed
50 cases of bribe taking."

"Not so long ago a high ranking official at the Kirov
District in St.Petersburg was detained for taking a bribe," he
said. "We try to see the reason of such behaviour, which may
be caused by a lack of control."

"Over 2010, there have been 56 cases for attempts to bribe
bailiffs," he added.

PTI

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