Sierra Leone`s Ebola-quarantined VP expelled from party

Sierra Leone`s Vice President Sam Sumana was expelled from the ruling party on Friday as he spent a sixth day confined to his home under Ebola quarantine.

AFP| Updated: Mar 07, 2015, 07:14 AM IST

Freetown: Sierra Leone`s Vice President Sam Sumana was expelled from the ruling party on Friday as he spent a sixth day confined to his home under Ebola quarantine.

The ruling All People`s Congress told a news conference in Freetown the action was unconnected to the outbreak and was the result of an investigation lasting several weeks into Sumana`s conduct and background.

"The VP has said he was a Muslim but investigations found this to be incorrect," said the party`s secretary-general Osman Yansaneh as he laid out a number of accusations against the vice president.

Yansaneh said Sumana`s claim to hold a degree from a US university had turned out to be false, and that he was also accused of being responsible for "frequent unrest" in his eastern home district of Kono.

The fourth allegation against Sumana was that he was plotting to set up a breakaway political party, Yansaneh told reporters at the party headquarters.

Yansaneh said Sumana remained Sierra Leone`s vice president, adding that "it`s up to the law to decide" whether he is eventually stripped of the post.

Sumana`s profile on the presidency website says he holds a Bachelor of Science degree in management information systems from the Metropolitan State University, Minnesota.

The 52-year-old also holds two diplomas, it says, one in diamond rough grading, sorting and polishing from an institue in Florida and another in computing from a business school in Minnesota.

Sumana`s aides said at the weekend he had decided to stay out of his office for 21 days and work from home after discovering a bodyguard had died of the Ebola virus. He was not available for comment on Friday.

Sierra Leone has registered almost 3,600 deaths in the nine months since the Ebola outbreak spread across west Africa.

More than 9,800 people have died of the disease, mainly in west African nations, since it emerged in southern Guinea in December 2013.