`Sino-Indian rivalry obsolete concept`
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Last Updated: Friday, October 01, 2010, 17:42
  
Beijing: Dismissing Sino-India rivalry as an "outdated" and "obsolete" geopolitical concept orchestrated by west, a state run newspaper said Asia and world have enough space for both to grow, even as it accepted that there are some bilateral issues to be resolved.

Blaming the "westerners and media agencies" for "overly exaggerating" the differences between the two countries, an article in the opinion page of 'People's Daily' of ruling Communist Party of China, (CPC), said contrary to projections the 'Dragon,' 'Elephant' cooperation is most rational choice than the confrontation and competition.

They "tend to overly exaggerate the two countries' differences in ideology and values, adhere to the obsolete geopolitical concept that two neighbouring powers are bound to be rivals and even have ill intentions to take third-party profits from the rivalry.”

“Such views are not only outdated but also against the history and reality of the development of Sino-Indian relations," it said.

Asia and the world have enough space for them to grow. Common development of the two countries is consistent with their common interests and also is a rational choice for both sides, it said.

The write up admits that "objectively speaking, Sino-Indian relations have experienced some ups and downs and now there are still some issues to be resolved. However, both sides are working together to eliminate these obstacles.”

“Sino-Indian relations cannot depart from the mainstream, and neither side is willing to deviate from it."

This is the second such article that appeared in the newspaper online edition in recent weeks blaming media for creating the wedge between the two countries.

The previous one few weeks ago blamed western media for creating confrontation between India, China and Pakistan with reports like Chinese Army’s presence in Pakistan Occupied Kashmir (PoK).

Write up in the state run Chinese media often regarded in the past as reflection of policy orientation of the secretive Chinese leadership but Indian diplomats, however, were wary of reading too much in such articles as India's interest in giving a greater push to bilateral ties is currently wearing thin.

Besides complicating the ties with policies like stapled visas to people of Jammu and Kashmir, leading to the denial of visa to top Indian General on the ground that he headed troop there, China so far has not taken any meaningful opening to Indian products to help bridge the trade gap.

The inability of Indian business houses to make any headway in China despite hard campaign made an exasperated Indian S Jaishankar to go public with India's concerns.

"Our IT industry has made little progress in penetrating the Chinese domestic market. Despite assurances, China's import of pharmaceuticals from India remains miniscule. The Indian companies struggle every day to overcome barriers posed by regulations, policy and market practices in China. We still don't have enough examples of success," he told a business seminar in Senzhen on September 29.

"Leaders of the two countries and some far-sighted people understand that China and India are great developing countries and share common interests. The prerequisite of developing Sino-Indian relations is for each to not regard the other as a threat with a foundation based on the 'Five Principles of Peaceful Coexistence'," it said.

"The healthy development of relations is beneficial to both sides as well as to Asia and the rest of the world. These common interests are the key to solve differences and conflicts between the two countries and promote bilateral relations.”

“It is normal that there is competition between the two countries in the global market but competition does not mean confrontation.”

“China and India have their own advantages and disadvantages, so they can learn from each other, showing their own special advantages," it said.

PTI


First Published: Friday, October 01, 2010, 17:42


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