Stop deadly actions against citizens: US to Syria

Last Updated: Tuesday, July 26, 2011 - 16:33

Washington: Renewing its charges that
President Bashar al Assad has lost legitimacy, the US has
asked the Syrian government to immediately halt its "deadly
actions" against protesters and release the detainees.

"We urge President Assad`s government to immediately
halt its deadly actions against peaceful protesters, to
release the detainees, and to respect and act upon the clear
demands of the Syrian people for a peaceful and democratic
transition to democracy," State Department spokesperson
Victoria Nuland said.

"This transition would be a positive step for Syria,
the region, and the world," she said, adding the US condemns
the violence in Syria, particularly the brutality practiced by
the Syrian government against its own citizens, peaceful
protesters and bystanders alike.

"The behavior of Syria`s security forces, including
other such barbaric shootings, wide scale arrests of young men
and boys, brutal torture, and other abuses of basic human
rights, is reprehensible," Nuland said in a statement.

"President Assad must understand that he is not
indispensible and we believe he is the cause of Syria`s
instability not the key to its stability. The regime should
make no mistake that the world is watching and those
responsible will be held accountable for their crimes," she
said, adding the violence will not suppress the legitimate
demands of the Syrian people to exercise their rights and
shape their own country’s future.

"It is another clear sign that President Assad has
lost legitimacy with the Syrian people, because he is
unwilling to lead a democratic transition. The violence
perpetrated against innocent civilians only contributes to
instability, feeds sectarian tensions and increases the Syrian
people`s distrust and anger at their government," Nuland said.

In some cities in Syria, people have been taking to
the streets since March 15 to demand democratic changes amid a
wave of protests across the Arab world.

PTI



First Published: Tuesday, July 26, 2011 - 16:33

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