Thai military should end repression, says Amnesty

Thailand`s military government has engaged in human rights violations since the May coup and it should now end its repression, Amnesty International on Thursday said in a report.

London: Thailand`s military government has engaged in human rights violations since the May coup and it should now end its repression, Amnesty International on Thursday said in a report.

The military took power May 22 after months of anti-government protests, saying it would return stability.

At least 27 people died during the six-month campaign by protestors to oust former leader Yingluck Shinawatra.

"Three months since the coup, a picture emerges from our investigations that of widespread and far-reaching human rights violations perpetrated by the military government," Amnesty International`s Asia-Pacific director Richard Bennett said.

"The Thai authorities should end this disturbing pattern of repression, end human rights violations, respect its international human rights obligations, and allow open debate and discussion," he added.

In an effort to adjust attitudes and stifle dissent, the military government known as the National Council for Peace and Order (NCPO) has engaged in systemic arbitrary arrests and detentions of hundreds of people.

Although most were held for only up to seven days, they were detained without charge or trial and denied access to lawyers.

The report also said the military government had blocked more than 200 websites, closed television and radio stations and clamped down on peaceful protests.

It added that some civilians have been tried in military courts and denied the right to appeal.

"Members of the international community should take all opportunities to encourage Thailand`s military government to change its course and ensure the respect for human rights to achieve national reconciliation," Bennett emphasised.

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