UK coalition to publish pledge account
  • This Section
  • Latest
  • Web Wrap
Last Updated: Wednesday, January 09, 2013, 19:36
  
London: Days after Britain's coalition government published its Mid-Term Review, Prime Minister David Cameron and his deputy Nick Clegg delayed publishing an audit of their hits and misses, according to a media report.

The dossier, which was to be published alongside the review on Monday, is expected to show that the vast majority of the coalition's election pledges have been met but acknowledge nearly 70 that have been missed, including some on pensions, road building and criminal justice.

According to the Daily Telegraph newspaper, officials had decided to delay the document's publication because they were concerned it would overshadow any favourable coverage of the Mid-Term Review.

The newspaper's analysis of the coalition's pledges suggests that action or announcements are "overdue" in 76 areas.

The worst-performing department is the Ministry of Justice, which failed to implement 15.1 per cent of planned policies.

Downing Street has denied trying to avoid negative coverage by delaying the document and insisted it had been held back to allow for the checking of "facts and figures".

Liberal Democrat leader Nick Clegg had promised last month to publish a "candid" audit of the government's performance as part of a Mid-Term Review.

The document, around 36,000 words long, is said to detail each of the 480 measures in the 2010 Coalition agreement released when the Tory-led government took over.

Unveiling their Mid-Term Review on Monday, Cameron and Clegg said the coalition would last a full five years and give Britain "strong, stable and determined leadership".

The Prime Minister promised help on childcare costs, care costs for the elderly and investment in roads, as they marked the halfway point of their government.

Opposition leader Ed Miliband accused the government of making "empty promises".

PTI


First Published: Wednesday, January 09, 2013, 19:36


comments powered by Disqus