UK PM tables demands for staying in EU

Britain's prime minister appealed to doubters at home and in other EU capitals on Tuesday to embrace his attempt to reform the 28 member bloc as a chance to boost prosperity rather than writing it off as "Mission Impossible." David Cameron, under pressure after overseeing what critics see as a lacklustre start to the renegotiation of Britain's ties with the European Union before a referendum, used a speech to offer the most detail yet on where he wants change.

London: Britain's prime minister appealed to doubters at home and in other EU capitals on Tuesday to embrace his attempt to reform the 28 member bloc as a chance to boost prosperity rather than writing it off as "Mission Impossible." David Cameron, under pressure after overseeing what critics see as a lacklustre start to the renegotiation of Britain's ties with the European Union before a referendum, used a speech to offer the most detail yet on where he wants change.

The EU executive was quick to call at least one of the British PM's demands -a limit on benefits EU migrants to Britain are entitled to -"highly problematic", while saying other proposals such as boosting the role of national parliaments in decisionmaking in the bloc appeared feasible.

Cameron left little room for doubt he wants Britain to stay in a reformed EU, linking for the first time British security to its membership -but he also warned that if his demands were met by a "deaf ear", he could lobby to leave.

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