UNSC strongly condemns Uganda bombing

The UNSC has condemned "in the strongest terms" the terror attack orchestrated by Somalia`s Al Shabab group in Uganda.

Last Updated: Jul 13, 2010, 13:17 PM IST

United Nations: The UN Security Council
has condemned "in the strongest terms" the terror attack
orchestrated by Somalia`s Al Shabab group in Uganda, that
claimed the lives of 74 people who had gathered to watch the
football World Cup final.

The Security Council called for the perpetrators of
the terror attack to be brought to justice and urged all
states to cooperate actively with the Ugandan authorities.

"The members of the Security Council underline the
need to bring perpetrators, organisers, financiers and
sponsors of these reprehensible acts of terrorism to justice,"
the statement said.

"They express their deep sympathy and condolences to
the victims of these heinous acts of terrorism and to their
families, and to the people and Government of Uganda".

An Al Qaeda linked groups in Somalia, Al Shabab, has
claimed responsibility for the two bombings in Uganda.

The extremist outfit considers Uganda and Burundi to
be enemies because these two countries provide troops to the
African Union peacekeeping force in the US.

The attack in Uganda on Sunday was the first to be
carried outside Somalia where Al-Shabab controls large swathes
of territory and is locked in a battle with the weak
Western-backed transitional Federal government.

US President Barack Obama offered his condolences to
Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni and offered FBI help.

They reaffirmed their commitment "to working together
to combat terrorist organisations that threaten innocent
civilians around the world," spokesperson Robert Gibbs said.

The spokesperson of the US State Department, P J
Crowley, said Yoweri had told the US Assistant Secretary of
State for African Affairs, Johnnie Carson, that Uganda did not
intend to back out of Somalia because of the terror attack.

"If Al-Shabab`s intent in orchestrating this was to
somehow weaken Uganda`s resolve, every indication we have says
the opposite," Crowley said.

"So if this was somehow aimed at punishing or
weakening Uganda`s resolve, we think that this has backfired,"
Crowley added.

Meanwhile, Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon extended his
condolences to the families of the victims who had been killed
in the deadly attack.

"The Secretary-General strongly condemns the vicious
bombings in Kampala that claimed lives of dozens of people and
left hundreds wounded among Ugandans and other nationalities
at establishments where they were watching the World Cup
final," said statement released by his office.

"The Secretary-General hopes the perpetrators of these
acts will be brought to justice and prosecuted," it added.

Second shock for family of Kampala`s American victim

New York: The distraught family of the
lone American killed in the Kampala blasts was hit by yet
another blow after the plane carrying his younger brother, who
was headed home to join family members in mourning, crashed
killing the pilot.

The Delaware family had lost their eldest son Nate
Henn on Sunday when explosions tore through crowds watching
the World Cup final in Uganda.

The 25-year-old American aid worker was hit by
shrapnel from one of the blasts in Kampala on Sunday.

His brother, Kyle Henn, was aboard a small plane
that crashed in North Carolina as he was rushing back to
rejoin his family in the time of grief.

The pilot of the plane died but Henn was admitted to
the hospital in a fair condition, but crash left the already
distraught family shocked, media reports said.

Nate, a former rugby player, had moved to Uganda to
work with former child soldiers, according to ABC news.

The group he worked, San Deigo based Christian aid
group "Invisible Children," said in a statement, saying: "His
love for the Ugandan students he had worked with is
exemplified by the deep friendships he forged with them".

"He was serving Innocent, Tony, Boni, Ronald, Papito,
Sunday and Lilian. These are some of our Ugandan students who
fell in love with Nate`s wit, strength, character and
steadfast friendship," it said.

The students, the group said, gave him the Acholi name
`Oteka,` which means `The Strong One`.

"Some of them were with him at the time of the
attack," the statement said.

An Al Qaeda linked groups in Somalia, Al Shabab, has
claimed responsibility for the two bombings in Uganda that
killed 74 people.

Five other Americans were injured in the attack.
The extremist outfit considers Uganda and Burundi as
enemies because these two countries provide troops to the
African Union peacekeeping force in the US.

The attack in Uganda on Sunday was the first to be
carried outside the Somalia where Al-Shabab controls large
swathes of territory and is locked in a battle with the weak
Western-backed Transitional Federal government of Somalia.
US President Barack Obama offered his condolences to
Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni and offered FBI help to
investigate the attack.

"The leaders reaffirmed their shared commitment to
working together to combat terrorist organisations that
threaten innocent civilians around the world," said Robert
Gibbs, White House spokesperson.

PTI