US mid-terms 2014: Republicans conquer Senate; tough times ahead for Barack Obama?

Riding on a wave of seething discontent among voters, coupled by plummeting approval ratings for President Barack Obama, the Republicans romped to victory in US mid-term elections, winning the Senate for the first time in eight years.

US mid-terms 2014: Republicans conquer Senate; tough times ahead for Barack Obama?

Washington: Riding on a wave of seething discontent among voters, coupled by plummeting approval ratings for President Barack Obama, the Republicans romped to victory in US mid-term elections, winning the Senate for the first time in eight years.

The victory of Republicans in Senate, means now they have an upper edge over Democrats and as they wrest control of both the houses of Congress.

The Republicans' rise in both the houses of Congress also means President Barack Obama will have to suffer tough times ahead in his final two years as the President.

By late Tuesday, Republicans had won at least 10 of the day’s 13 closely contested Senate races, more than the margin they needed to control the Senate for the first time since 2007. GOP candidates held on to seats in Georgia, Kansas and Kentucky, and took seats held by Democrats in Iowa, Colorado, Arkansas, Montana, South Dakota, West Virginia and North Carolina.

Those victories came on a night dominated by Republicans nationwide. In the House, the GOP expanded on its existing majority. In governor’s races, Republicans Rick Scott of Florida and Scott Walker of Wisconsin won re-election.

In the Senate races, Democrats appeared to have kept just one of the states they had spent two years and millions of dollars trying to save — New Hampshire, where incumbent Jeanne Shaheen defeated Republican Scott Brown, the former Massachusetts senator who had moved across the state line to run again from his vacation home.

And they seemed in danger of losing a seat nobody thought was at risk: In Virginia, Sen. Mark Warner, a Democrat, was in a razor-close race against Republican challenger Ed Gillespie, Senate races in Louisiana and Alaska remained undecided late Tuesday.

With Agency Inputs

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