US-Pak did not trust each other: Gilani
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Last Updated: Monday, December 12, 2011, 00:22
  
London: Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani on Sunday acknowledged that US-Pak ties had plunged to level that they "did not trust each other" as he did not rule out closing Pakistan's airspace to the US.

Ties between Washington and Islamabad, which have long been strained by the US-led military campaign against militants in Afghanistan, has plunged following a cross border air strikes on November 26 that killed 24 Pakistani soldiers.

Gilani underlined the need for Pakistan and the US to reduce the trust deficit between them.

"Yes there is a credibility gap, we are working together and still we don't trust each other," Gilani said.

"I think we have to improve our relationship so that... we should have more confidence in each other," he was quoted as saying by BBC.

Discussing his country's relationship with the US in in an interview to BBC, he refused to rule out closing Pakistan's airspace to the US.

An angry Pakistani leadership had halted all supply convoys to Afghanistan through its border region and set December 11 as the deadline for the US to vacate Shamsi airbase, reportedly used by CIA-operated drones that target militants in the country's restive tribal belt.

Gilani said Pakistan may continue its blocking of NATO convoys into Afghanistan for several weeks.

US-led NATO forces has apologised for the air strikes, calling them a "tragic unintended incident".

The Pakistan Army today took over Shamsi airbase in the country's southwest after it was vacated by US forces in line with a deadline set by the government.

The last flight carrying US personnel and equipment had departed from Shamsi airbase in Balochistan province and the facility had been "completely vacated" by the Americans, the Inter-Services Public Relations said in Islamabad.

Much of the gear and at least five drones were transferred to Afghanistan. Over 70 Americans were based at Shamsi, media reports said.

PTI


First Published: Sunday, December 11, 2011, 23:55


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