Why did South Korean loudspeakers at the border anger North?

The two Korean neighbours on Monday night managed to stitch up a peace deal, dousing to rest the fears of another South-North war.

By Supriya Jha | Last Updated: Aug 25, 2015, 17:50 PM IST
Why did South Korean loudspeakers at the border anger North?

Seoul: The two Korean neighbours on Monday night managed to stitch up a peace deal, dousing to rest the fears of another South-North war.

At the heart of the deal, lies South Korean acceptance of North's demand that the loudspeakers blaring out anti-Pyongyang propaganda at the border be turned off.

The North Korea earlier, also threatened South with military action if it did not halt loudspeaker propaganda.

Also Read: War fears defused for now as North Korea, South Korea strike deal

However, the matters were placated as after over 40 hours of negotiations at the “truce village”, North agreed to express “regret” over the loss of two South Korean soldiers' lives in a landmine blast, leading South to relent as it decided to stop the propaganda broadcasts on Tuesday noon.

So, what exactly did the loudspeakers broadcast that infuriated Pyongyang so much so that it rushed its troops to the border to be prepared for war.

According to a report by a local South Korean news site, the loudspeaker broadcasts were a mix of pro-South Korea news and anti-Pyongyang rhetoric interspersed with Korean pop songs and weather report.

"We want to console and deliver the truth to our brethren in the North who are suffering under a foolish leader," the loudspeakers from South were quoted as per a local news site 'The Chosun Ilbo' which obtained some recordings.

The broadcasts also explained how South Korean President Park Geun-hye visited China thrice while Kim Jong Un did not visit Beijing even once as he was "young and afraid of being rejected by other world leaders."

The broadcasts also presented South Korea in a brighter light, hailing its economic developments, while accusing North of landmine blast.

As per the report, the loudspeakers were set up in 11 locations along the border and blared out 3-hour long propaganda thrice a day timed randomly to prevent North from trying to drown them out with its own broadcasts. 

According to experts, the cause of North's anger is that it worries its people and soldiers at the border may get influenced by the loudspeaker broadcasts and might flee to South.