US Navy gunman Aaron Alexis: A Buddhist convert with mental issues
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Last Updated: Wednesday, September 18, 2013, 10:00
  
Zee Media Bureau

Washington: The gunman identified as Aaron Alexis who killed 12 people at US naval base was an ex-Navy serviceman who is said to have been a Buddhist convert and had serious mental issues, reports said.

Aaron's family members told investigators that he was being treated for his mental health issues. Officials reportedly confirmed this when they said that the US Navy veteran had been treated since August by the federal Veterans Administration.

Aaron had been receiving treatment for paranoia, sleeping troubles and hearing voices, a news agency report said.

According to a report by the USA Today, Aaron Alexis “contributed to two prior shooting incidents in Seattle and Fort Worth” but that did not result in any casualties.

In 2004, he was arrested in a gun related incident in which he shot the tyres of a construction worker’s car. However, he was not charged with the crime.

In 2010, he shot through the floor of an upstairs apartment. However, he claimed that the shooting was an accident.

Despite having a history of violence, Alexis had security clearance that gave him access to the Navy Yard but he was discharged from Navy due to a series of misconducts, US media reports said.

Identified as 34-year-old Aaron Alexis from Fort Worth, Texas, the suspected gunman was later shot dead by the police after he went on a shooting spree inside a building in Washington Navy Yard. The FBI are still clueless about the motive behind the shooting but the emerging reports that the shooter had mental issues may be one of the reasons.

Alexis had worked as a Navy Reservist and received a general discharge in 2011.

Born in New York City in 1979, he first worked as an IT worker for a defence department subcontractor called The Experts.

He was also Awarded National Defense Service medal and Global War on Terrorism Service medal.


First Published: Tuesday, September 17, 2013, 17:14


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