Work towards India`s ascension to UNSC says Bera

Washington: Calling for moving the Indo-US relationship ahead, two influential American lawmakers have called upon the Obama Administration to work towards making India a permanent member of the United Nations Security Council.

Washington: Calling for moving the Indo-US relationship ahead, two influential American lawmakers have called upon the Obama Administration to work towards making India a permanent member of the United Nations Security Council.

"If the US and India can move our relationship further ahead, it could benefit our own constituents, as well as people throughout the world. Working on a path for India`s ascension to the United Nations Security Council is one important way to take concrete steps forward," Congressmen Joe Crowley and Ami Bera wrote in an op-ed to The Hill newspaper yesterday.

Both are from the Democratic Party.
Crowley is the Co-Chair of the Congressional Caucus on India and Indian Americans, while Bera is the only Indian American in the current Congress.

"Deepening our technological, security, educational and economic ties in a way that creates more high-paying American jobs is another.
"Beyond these priorities, India and the United States can collaborate on countless individual initiatives, in areas like research, transportation or development," the two Congressmen wrote on the eve of the counting of votes for the crucial Indian general elections.
Crowley and Bera said India and the US have many common underlying interests.

"We share goals in standing up against terrorism,ensuring stability in South Asia and globally,in growing our economies, and increasing development. Indians have also faced many problems similar to our own ? after all, it was only weeks after 9/11 that the Indian Parliament was attacked," they wrote.

"One thing is certain: moving closer together will do more good for our two countries than moving apart. In many ways, this is already happening organically," they said.
"With more than 3 million Indian-Americans in the United States, many of whom remain close to families still in India, our people-to-people ties are stronger than ever and expanding by the day."

"Most Americans interact daily with Indian-American community members, who are visible and active in all aspects of our national life, whether it is business, entertainment, public service, medicine, religion, education and more," they wrote.

"The elections in India are a good reminder about the importance of democracy, our countries` shared histories, and the potential for future growth. But they are also an opportunity to review, renew and reinvigorate our ties with a natural friend and partner," the duo added.

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